Analysis of the Roman Coins from Great Eversden


As I mentioned in my earlier posting to date I have found up to 20 Roman coins dating from the 3rd to 5th centuries AD. Due to the heavy clay soil of the area they largely come out of the ground in a pretty mucky state but with some careful (yes don’t worry VERY careful) cleaningI can generally get them to a state where the emperor and legends are decipherable, and so attributing a known date to them is possible.

What many people don’t understand is that whilst it is possible to apparently date the coins, these coins are not marked as our modern coins are instead they are attributable to a period (it can a couple of years or even a score of years or more). What is also important to remember is that the coins would have stayed in circulation for a considerable period of time, so for example if a coin was minted in 350 AD it is quite possible it was used for another 10 or more years before being lost or discarded.

So without further ado here is the list of coins so far recovered and identified, the others are awaiting cleaning and identification and I will post them later:

Radiate of Tetricus I 271-274 AD.

Diam. 19.44; Weight 1.95g

Material: Copper Alloy

Denomination: Radiate (Antoninianus)

Obverse: Radiate Bust , Right

Inscription: IMP TETRICVS PF AVG

Reverse: Soldier with spear and shield

Inscription: VITVS AVG

Radiate of Tetricus I 271 274 - AD

Tetricus I - REV

Tetricus I, mid 271 – spring 274 A.D.

Tetricus I succeeded to the throne of the Gallic empire after the death of Victorinus. After three years of rule, the power of the separatist state had declined and in 273 A.D. Aurelian invaded. Tetricus I immediately abdicated rather than fight the vastly superior forces of Aurelian. Tetricus and his son were both honored by Aurelian and they lived quite comfortably in Rome.

Unknown Radiate

Radiate Illegible

Radiate: Ruler uncertain Mid 1st to 3rd Century AD

Diam. 16.14; Weight 1.65

Material: Copper Alloy

Denomination: Radiate (Antoninianus)

Obverse: illegible

Inscription: illegible

Reverse: illegible

Inscription: illegible

Tetricus II

Radiate of Tetricus II 271-274 AD. OBV is illegible rev is PRINCIVVENT (the prince as a leader of youth).

Diam. 18.98; Weight 2.29g

Material: Copper Alloy

Denomination: Radiate (Antoninianus)

Obverse: illegible

Inscription:

Reverse: The prince as a leader of youth

Inscription: PRINCIVVENT

Radiate of Tetricus II OBVRadiate of Tetricus II REV

Tetricus II, spring 274 A.D.

Tetricus II’s father succeeded to the throne of the Gallic empire after the death of Victorinus and made him Caesar in 273 and Augustus in spring 274 A.D. After three years of rule, the power of the separatist state had declined and in 273 A.D. Aurelian invaded. Tetricus I abdicated rather than fight the vastly superior forces of Aurelian. Tetricus II and his father were both honored by Aurelian and they lived quite comfortably in Rome.

Nummus of Crispus 318-324 AD

Radiate, Nummus of Crispus 318-324 AD

Diam. 16.97 Weight 2g

Material: Copper Alloy

Denomination: Nummus(AE1 AE4)

Obverse: Helmeted and cuirassed bust, left

Obverse Legend: IVL CRIS/PVS NOBC

Reverse: Alter inscribed VOTIS XX with globe on top

Reverse Inscription: BEATRANQUILLITAS

Nummus of Crispus 318-324 AD OBVNummus of Crispus 318-324 AD REV

Crispus, Caesar 317 – 326 A.D.

Flavius Julius Crispus was the son of Constantine I by his first wife. A brilliant soldier, Crispus was well loved by all until 326 A.D., when Constantine had him executed. It is said that Fausta, Crispus stepmother, anxious to secure the succession for her own sons falsely accused Crispus of raping her. Constantine, learning of Fausta’s treachery, had her executed too.

Nummus of Constans 348-350AD

Nummus of Constans 348-350AD

Diam. 22.26 Weight 4.6g

Material: Copper Alloy

Denomination: Nummus(AE1 AE4)

Obverse: Diademed, darped and cuirassed bust, right

Obverse Legend: DN CONSTANS PF AVG

Reverse: The emperor in a galley with a standard holding a pheonix

Reverse Inscription: FEL TEMP REPARATIO

Mint Lyon (Lugdunum)

Constans 348-350 AD OBVConstans 348-350 AD REV

Constans, 9 September 337 – 19 January 350 A.D.

Constans was the youngest son of Constantine I and Fausta. Born around 320, Constans inherited part of the Western Empire upon its division among the sons of Constantine. In 340, his brother, Constantine II, invaded his territory but was defeated and killed leaving Constans in total control of the West. In 350, however, the general Magnentius rebelled and Constans fled as his legions switched sides. He was overtaken and killed while trying to escape to Spain.

Maiorina of  Constantius Gallus

Maiorina     : Ruler Constantius Gallus

Diam.; 21 Weight  TBC

Material: Copper Alloy

Denomination:

Obverse: Bare headed, draped and cuirassed, bust right

Inscription: D N CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C

Reverse: Helmeted soldier with a shield on his left arm spearing a fallen horseman wearing a pointed cap

Inscription: FEL TEMP REPARATIO “Happy Days are Here Again”

Constantius Gallus 351-354 A.D OBVConstantius Gallus 351-354 A.D REV

Constantius Gallus, Caesar 28 September 351 – winter 354 A.D.

Constantius Gallus was a cousin of Constantius II and was made Caesar in 351 A.D. He was given command of the Eastern provinces while Constantius II was in the West. His rule was so harsh and cruel that Constantius recalled him to Milan, and then had him arrested and executed before he reached Italy.

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